Hg2 : The Hedonist

A Hedonist’s guide to…

Rome

Basilica di San Clemente
This is the most fantastic archaeological sandwich in all of Rome and the closest you'll get to time travel.
MACRO
Rome's cultural heritage is inevitably bound up in the past - which is why it took quite some time for the city to wake up to the contemporary art scene.
Capitoline Museums
This is one of the oldest public museums in the world, starting life in 1471 when benevolent Pope Sixtus IV decided to bestow upon the city a collection of bronze sculptures.
Galleria Borghese
The Galleria Borghese set in the gardens of the eponymous park was the first example of a building created specifically to display a private collection of art.
MAXXI
Paintings, art installations, videos, sculptures and photographs are on display in this brand new museum, which has caused something of a stir since its opening in 2010.
Santa Maria del Popolo
 Despite the unassuming exterior, this church in the corner of the Piazza del Popolo is in fact a treasure-trove of masterpieces.
Villa del Priorato di Malta
Not a monument per se, but a hole around one and an oddity that attracts dozens of people everyday who queue to peek through a lock.
Colosseum
Work got underway for the Colosseum in AD 72 and took a mere eight years to complete, thanks mostly to slave labour.
Keats-Shelley House
Among the first Brits to tread the city's streets, the Grand Tour Romantic poets Keats and Shelley have informed much of our conception of Italy, and especially
Palazzo Barberini
This gargantuan baroque palace was commissioned by the Barberini pope Urban VIII and was originally completed in a zealous five years of labour.
L’Ara Pacis
The Ara Pacis or 'altar of peace' was inaugurated in 9 B.C. to celebrate the wealth and security that the emperor Augustus had brought by pacifying Gaul and Spain.
Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna
Seventy-five relatively crowd-free rooms house Italy's largest collection of home-grown 19th- and 20th-century art that includes Boccioni, Morandi, Fontana and
Orto Botanico
The Orto Botanico occupies the gardens of the Palazzo Corsini, and was once the property of Queen Cristina of Sweden.
Fori Imperiali
The area known as the Forum was the nucleus of urban Roman life where everything, from commerce and business to prostitution and the administration of justice, took place, and where news and announcements were disseminated.
Centrale Montemartini
This museum is a fascinating antidote to the well-trodden culture trail and is a good excuse to get out to Ostiense, an up-and-coming (and fashionably gritty) area of Rome.
Villa Farnesina
This villa was originally the holiday home for Renaissance playboy banker Agostino Chigi, built between 1508 and 1511 by Baldassare Peruzzi.
Vatican Museums
Despite the torrential flood of visitors and conditions that would have the EU up in arms if it were for the carriage of livestock, the Vatican museums are a definitive stop on Rome's cultural itinerary and home to the wondrous Sistine Chapel.
St Peter’s Basilica
St Peter's Basilica is nothing short of overwhelming and represents the temporal power of the Catholic Church on earth.
Santa Maria Maggiore
This is one of the earliest of all of Rome's basilicas, dating from the 3rd century.
Santa Maria della Vittoria
Rather modest by baroque standards, this church near the Via Veneto houses one of Bernini's most notorious sculptures, the sensual Ecstasy of St Theresa (fourth chapel on the left).
Santa Maria in Trastevere
This church was one of the first Christian basilicas in Rome, possibly even the place where the first Christian mass was celebrated when Christianity was legalized in 313.
Sant’Ivo alla Sapienza
This little-visited and little-known church is a bombastic testament to architect and sculptor Borromini's creativity.
San Luigi dei Francesi
This church serves the French community in Rome and is a convenient stop on the way to the Pantheon or Piazza Navona, or indeed after a coffee at caffeine mecca Sant'Eustachio.
Pantheon
The emperor Hadrian's temple to the Roman deities is the oldest building in all of Rome, built between AD 119 and 128.
Palazzo delle Esposizioni
Sitting at the end of the busy Via Nazionale, just a few steps from Monti and Piazza Venezia, the white-marbled Palazzo delle Esposizioni is a large exhibition area, known especially for its photography shows.
Trevi Fountain
The Trevi fountain surprises most visitors on first glance because of its unexpectedly cramped quarters.
Introducing Rome’s new MAXXI museum
Created by Anglo-Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid, Rome's MAXXI museum is a display of art installations, sculpture, videos and photographs.

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